Becker’s Hospital Review: Disruptive Healthcare Companies to Watch in 2017

Healthcare is ripe with opportunity for investors and entrepreneurs. Mobile health, sophisticated consumer expectations, data transparency and preference for on-demand services at a flat fee have ushered in a class of companies that resist the status quo. Here are 11 companies disrupting healthcare today. They’re worth keeping an eye on. Read the full article here.

PRESS RELEASE: swyMed Announces Formation of Scientific Advisory Board

Physicians with outstanding leadership and clinical experience introduced as members

Lexington, Mass. – January 31, 2017 – swyMed, a provider of exceptional-quality video telemedicine solutions, today announced the creation of its Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) with four key appointments: Lester Wold, M.D.; James McCarthy, M.D.; Ronald Merrell, M.D.; and Noah Rosen, M.D. The Scientific Advisory Board will advise swyMed on the highest value applications for swyMed’s truly mobile telemedicine solutions, and how innovative healthcare providers can further use the technology to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs. Read more

New Year, New President: What Is the Future of Telemedicine?

Amidst the uncertainty that typically follows a transition in presidents and their administrations, the telemedicine industry received rousing support this week. During his confirmation hearing, Congressman Tom Price, President Trump’s pick for Secretary of Health and Human Services, revealed his high regard for telemedicine and his belief that telemedicine is a critical aspect of health care. In addition, his priorities of universal access to care and cost-effective care suggest that strategies that meet both criteria—such as telemedicine—will be favored. Thus, it seems certain that the future of telemedicine looks bright. Read more

Doctor at night in hospital

Telenocturnists Ease Burdens for All

Previously, patients admitted in the middle of the night have had a higher mortality rate, according to the American Medical Association. Soon, however, this statistic may be a thing of the past; telenocturnists have begun volunteering for the less-desired weekend and nighttime shifts, and they’re hoping to lessen the disparity in outcomes while reducing the financial burden on hospitals. Read more

A patient undergoes dialysis treatment

Tele-Nephrology Brings Dialysis to Rural Areas

A pilot program in Kentucky has shown that tele-nephrology can deliver dialysis treatments and other needed care effectively in rural areas. Doctors at the University of Cincinnati teamed up with Dialysis Clinics Inc. to bring dialysis to Meadowview Regional Medical Center in Maysville, Kentucky, to treat patients who needed medical, surgical, or critical care. Two-thirds of the patients were treated successfully and discharged. Now, the hospital provides around-the-clock care to patients with kidney and electrolyte disorders. Read more


Tele-ICU Programs Pay for Themselves

Some new research shows that when it comes to intensive care units (ICUs), investing in telemedicine pays significant dividends: Combining a tele-ICU program with centralized bed management can increase case volume by roughly 40 percent and raise contribution margins by over $52 million. The differences were attributed to shorter lengths of stay, a higher ratio of case revenue to direct costs, and higher case volume. Read more