woman checking skin for melanoma

Teledermatology Can Save Lives

Frustrated with lengthy wait times to see a dermatologist, a group of community health centers in Massachusetts has negotiated their own telemedicine reimbursement with four health plans to implement a teledermatology program in order to improve access. Backed by a Partnership for Community Health grant, in its first year the platform has expedited more than 112 cases and referred 60 percent back to the primary care physician without a need for an in-person dermatology visit, saving an estimated 30 percent in annual costs by eliminating unnecessary specialist consults. Read more

businessman touching internet concept

How Does the Net Neutrality Repeal Affect Telemedicine?

Last month, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted 3-2 along partisan lines to repeal the 2015 ruling that instituted net neutrality. When the repeal takes effect in February, internet service providers (ISPs) will no longer be prohibited from blocking or slowing particular web content, or from charging distinct prices for different connection speeds. While some experts welcome the freedom of an open internet, transparency rules, and the stimulation of business development, others are more skeptical of the ramifications of such a move on the telemedicine industry and its patients. Read more

Stethoscope and gavel

Year in Review: 2017 Telemedicine Legislation

Over the last year, 63 pieces of telemedicine legislation focusing on telemedicine were approved in 34 states, according to the Center for Connected Health Policy. These bills facilitated multi-state medical licenses, defined terminology, and established care standards, among other issues. Read more

Telemedicine Specialists: A New Discipline?

Considering the steady growth of the telemedicine industry, two physicians at New York-Presbyterian have proposed the creation of a new specialty representing the “medical virtualist.” In a recent JAMA Viewpoint article, the authors cite a combination of the lack of oversight, inconsistent training, and specific skill sets, including webside manner, as compelling reasons for certifying full-time telemedicine specialists with a defined set of core competencies. Read more

swyMed-CMO-Noah-Rosen

swyMed CMO Noah Rosen selected as one of Boston Magazine’s Top Doctors

 

In the world of medicine, Boston is a world leader, with top hospitals like Mass General, Brigham and Women’s, Beth-Israel Deaconess and Tufts, not to mention top medical schools.  The Boston area attracts doctors who want to be “part of the action” in this thriving, energetic community.  Boston is to medicine, what New York is to Finance and Hollywood is to Film.  It isn’t everything, but it’s a lot.

Boston Magazine annually has a peer-nominated and reviewed listing of the Top Doctors in each field.

Noah Rosen, swyMed’s CMO was named to the 2017 Top Doctors list for Vascular Surgery so we wanted to take a moment to say Congratulations Noah !

Boston-Magazine-Top-Doctors-2017

child PM&R

Children’s Tele-physiatry Program Debuts

For children in remote communities, obtaining care for physical impairments can be challenging. Soon, a new program will change that for some youngsters: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has awarded the University of California Davis Department of Pediatrics a $2 million, five-year grant to set up a tele-physiatry project for children with spina bifida, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injuries, and other disabilities. Read more

NBC News Affiliate Highlights swyMed’s Mobile Telehealth Solution

swyMed recently announced that it has joined forces with the Commission on State Emergency Communications (CSEC) and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) on a program to implement telemedicine between EMS providers and a select group of trauma centers in rural West Texas. The objective of the project is to improve patient outcomes by using telemedicine technology to bring the judgment of trauma surgeons into the back of ambulances to assess and direct treatment. Read more

elder lady sitting with a walker

UC Riverside Testing MS Telemedicine

Telemedicine is already in use to help patients with stroke treatment or debilitating chronic conditions such as Parkinson’s disease; now, a study is exploring whether the platform can work for patients with multiple sclerosis. The University of California Riverside was awarded a $100,000 grant from biotech firm Genentech to set up a one-year pilot program in order to determine whether an MS telemedicine visit can replace office visits for patients who have difficulties with travel. Read more

elderly man with walker trying to stand

Telemedicine for Movement Disorders Is Well-Received

A professor at Emory University is finding great success in using telemedicine for movement disorders. Recently, Jaime Hatcher-Martin, MD, PhD, a movement disorders specialist at Emory University Hospital, was asked about her experiences with telemedicine. Having founded Emory’s movement disorders telemedicine clinic, Hatcher-Martin is ready to offer guidance to clinicians who are interested in telemedicine. Read more

bedside manner

Telemedicine Drives Development of “Webside” Manners

It’s well-known that a physician’s bedside manner can help him reassure and relate to a patient, but what about “webside” manner? With the growing popularity of telemedicine, the bulk of the attention is given to the technology driving the industry, but providers are finding that their body language cues are taking on entirely new meanings in front of the webcam. Read more