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Doctor Accessing Data within Blockchain in Telemedicine

Exploring Blockchain in Telemedicine

In previous years, the buzz around blockchain technology has centered mostly around cryptocurrency. As blockchain becomes a more widely understood and accepted concept, however, early adopters in other industries are beginning to envision upgrades in healthcare delivery that could result from the integration of blockchain technology—essentially, blockchain in telemedicine. Touted for its ability to decentralize control of protected health information (PHI) while maintaining trust, accountability, security, and transparency in its data transactions, blockchain can offer a reliable method for transporting and verifying sensitive information while providing clinical researchers with a wealth of anonymous data. Read more

logo TechRadar for best telemedicine companies article

swyMed Named in Best Telemedicine Companies for 2019

TechRadar, an international technology news and reviews site, recently assembled a list of the best telemedicine companies for 2019. Out of over 250 telemedicine companies on the market, swyMed is honored to have been named as #3. Besides being able to deliver the expected benefits of telemedicine—including reduced travel, time and costs, as well as increased convenience and efficiency—the top platforms must also have the following essential features, as outlined by TechRadar: Read more

JKroon & EGerritsen, presenting award

swyMed Wins Smart Solutions Award

Just this week, at the World of Health Care 2018 (WoHC), conference delegates voted swyMed as the winner of the Smart Solutions Award due to our DOT Telemedicine Backpack’s innovations in tackling challenges to modernize, optimize, and increase the quality, affordability, and accessibility of healthcare. Read more

doctor with stethoscope on laptop's screen

Enterprise Telemedicine Programs Raise the Bar

The results are in: The REACH Health 2018 U.S. Telemedicine Industry Benchmark survey has been released, and its findings are illuminating. Despite the obstacles presented by lack of reimbursement, parity, and electronic medical record (EMR) integration, telemedicine has been growing by leaps and bounds, especially as enterprise telemedicine programs rather than departmental endeavors as they originally began. And this enterprise-based strategy has been paying off—big time. Read more

Telemedicine Benchmark Survey Reveals the State of the Industry

A new telemedicine industry benchmark survey, published by REACH Health, reveals the state of the industry and where it’s headed. Respondents include healthcare executives, doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals in various organizations with revenues varying from under $50 million to over $1 billion. Read more

MACRA consists of the APM and MIPS programs

Medicare Reimbursements Shift towards Quality of Care

In an open letter last Friday, October 14, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), announced the finalized policies for implementing the new Medicare Quality Payment Program (QPP). Although the rule takes effect on January 1, 2017, several components will be phased in over the next few years to give physicians time to adjust accordingly. Many of the policies have been updated from the previous proposal in response to feedback from clinicians across the country. Read more

Mobile health is here to stay!

Mobile Health: Patients Want It All

When it comes to combining personal health with the convenience of mobile devices, what do smartphone users really want? A recent study suggests that people want to be fully engaged online, including accessing their health records and communicating with their healthcare providers—all from their phones and tablets. It’s a great idea in theory, but can everything actually fit into one application? Read more

5 Ways (and why) to Help HIT and Telemedicine Adoption

A few articles came out this week that I that I feel underscore the need for providers – both large hospital systems and private practices – need to get off their collective derrières and start implementing HIT and Telemedicine.

Thankfully, we are going to provide them valuable advice to help make this happen later in this piece. However, let’s start with a brief discussion of some of this week’s materials.

In a piece Read more

Let’s Operate on Interoperability

Wednesday, MedCity News and Life as a Healthcare CIO ran what I believe to be a very important piece on interoperability by Dr. John D. Halamka. I don’t agree with him that attempts to legislate interoperability into being should be jettisoned completely, but most of his points ring true.

Early on he asks the question that SHOULD be core to the HIT and Telemedicine industries, but especially for EHR vendors: “So what is our next step to help providers…to the point that Congress no longer wants to legislate the solution to the problem?” Read more

Hackers and Telemedicine Security – Thoughts?

hacked

Today’s reporting (and here, here, and many other places) that Community Health Systems hospital network was hacked for personal information is alarming.  Although no credit card–and NO CARE INFORMATION–was taken, social security, birthdays, and addresses all were.  That is, everything necessary to open bank accounts, sign up for credit cards, and nearly anything else that counts as identity theft.

As potentially bad for the patients as this is, it’s equally bad for Community Health Systems.  Apparently their stock took only a brief hit (CYH), although it wouldn’t be shocking if it moves lower again assuming the news becomes more widespread and if they are sued.  This scenario is possible because although–and I would like to emphasize this yet again–NO CARE INFORMATION WAS TAKEN (medical histories, treatments, etc.) the information was still covered under HIPAA.  (They do have insurance to cover cyber liability, but even so…)

I do not know how the data was kept or encrypted.  It’s interesting…and somewhat heartening…to know that the care information was not accessed by the hackers.  However, I believe it helps us remember that no system is completely safe, and that the highest available level of security should always be used.  Currently, regarding encryption, that would be AES 256-bit encryption.  It also means use of secure one-time-use keys for communication software endpoints and conscientious use of regularly changed passwords by users.  It means keeping devices used within networks either on VPNs (vitual private networks) or, again, using 256-bit encrypted, password-secured communication over non-VPN networks (and why not do it on the VPNs anyway?).

So, now the question is: Does this security breach have any implications for telemedicine and mHealth?  My guess is that mHealth is probably at the greater risk.  I think there’s less of a general use for cybercriminals for care data than simply personal data, and that certain types of personal data, such as location data combined with the pedometer on (could indicate you’re out jogging 10 miles from your house…might be a good time to break in), make mHealth a little more nerve-wracking.  Just a guess.  There may be very creative ways to make use of mass medical histories and treatment information that just hasn’t been discovered yet.  Thoughts?

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