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elder lady sitting with a walker

UC Riverside Testing MS Telemedicine

Telemedicine is already in use to help patients with stroke treatment or debilitating chronic conditions such as Parkinson’s disease; now, a study is exploring whether the platform can work for patients with multiple sclerosis. The University of California Riverside was awarded a $100,000 grant from biotech firm Genentech to set up a one-year pilot program in order to determine whether an MS telemedicine visit can replace office visits for patients who have difficulties with travel. Read more

elderly man with walker trying to stand

Telemedicine for Movement Disorders Is Well-Received

A professor at Emory University is finding great success in using telemedicine for movement disorders. Recently, Jaime Hatcher-Martin, MD, PhD, a movement disorders specialist at Emory University Hospital, was asked about her experiences with telemedicine. Having founded Emory’s movement disorders telemedicine clinic, Hatcher-Martin is ready to offer guidance to clinicians who are interested in telemedicine. Read more

youth football player

Teleneurology Can Deliver Real-Time Concussion Care to Young Athletes

Each year, up to 3.8 million traumatic brain injuries occur—over 75 percent of which are sports-related. Although the professional and elite levels are addressing the issue, many youth and collegiate programs can’t keep concussion specialists on hand to provide an immediate response on the sidelines. A recent study, spearheaded by Mayo Clinic, explored whether telemedicine technology could be used by concussion specialists to assess players’ conditions in real time. Although teleneurology has already been shown to be effective for evaluating and treating acute neurologic conditions such as stroke, concussion management is a new territory. Read more

Elderly man using telemedicine for speech therapy on tablet computer

Telemedicine for Speech Therapy Preserves Language Skills

At Northwestern University, telemedicine for speech therapy is helping dementia patients improve deteriorating language skills. As neurodegenerative illnesses progress, patients often struggle with recalling names and words, such as a grandchild’s name or the appropriate words for ordering lunch. After completing an eight-week course of therapy sessions and home assignments, study participants demonstrated a significant improvement in recalling troublesome words; after six months, the improvement remained. Read more

A passerby helps a woman with stroke.

New Standards Published for Telestroke Programs

For the first time, official guidelines have been published for the use of telemedicine in potential stroke cases. The American Heart Association (AHA) and American Stroke Association (ASA) recently released a joint scientific statement describing quality measures and outcomes for telestroke. The document was prepared in response to the rapid growth of telestroke over the past decade. Now, hospitals can quantitatively measure their telestroke programs against these standards in order to ensure they are providing high quality care. Read more

Supporting Parkinson's patient with cane

Telemedicine Pilot Program Successful for Parkinson’s Patients

Patients with Parkinson’s disease are used to devoting an entire day and driving long miles to be seen by a specialist. That doesn’t mean it’s easy. Thanks to telemedicine, though, this could soon change. Last fall, Rush University Medical Center launched a telemedicine pilot program that allows patients to visit their physicians virtually, from the comfort of their own homes. Read more

Microcephaly comparison

Telemedicine Brings Healthcare to Zika Victims

Amidst all the worries of the Zika epidemic affecting babies in Brazil, here’s a bit of encouraging news. Dr. Sandra Mattos, a pediatric cardiologist, is using telemedicine to increase those infants’ access to care. Her efforts have overcome poor infrastructure, especially in remote areas, that typically prevent families from receiving needed health care. Read more